ReiTech: Safety Audits

By: Reitech  09-12-2011
Keywords: risk assessment, Machine Safety, Industrial Technology

The Risk Assessment Audit

The ReiTech safeguarding audit method makes it possible for ReiTech personnel, qualified consulting professionals or a school district safety representative to conduct a consistent and thorough risk assessment of industrial technology classrooms and maintenance shops. Only ReiTech offers you two comprehensive options for conducting safety audits. You pick the option that best fits your needs: An effective machine safety program starts with a thorough analysis of the potential hazards created by the use of the machines. This analysis is done with the understanding that students rather than professional operators will operate these machines. The potential hazards, electrical, mechanical and non-mechanical are identified and prioritized. The prioritization of the physical guarding requirements is based on a combination of multiple predictable injury factors and the probability of occurrence. Dealing with each factor independently, values are assigned to these factors. This audit is conducted in accordance with a carefully designed process for collecting and recording a comprehensive and accurate summary of machine conditions relative to applicable standards and regulations. Present machine conditions are documented using the comprehensive survey guides, safeguarding evaluation forms, and supported by extensive photographs. The compiled data is then forwarded to ReiTech where a detailed report that includes color pictures of each piece of equipment, accurately identified by listing the make model and serial number is produced. The report identifies safety hazards and provides relevant regulatory justification following OSHA, National Fire Protection Associations, (NFPA), National Electric Code (NEC), and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) codes. Several photographic examples of similar machines fully guarded are also provided to ensure that each machine will have:
  • Properly located and clearly marked controls including an emergency stop system
  • Power outage protection – to prevent unplanned restart after loss of power supply
  • Guarded point of operation- to help prevent operator contact with the bit or blade
  • Guarded power transmission system – to help prevent operator contact with the driving gears, belts, shafts and pulleys
  • Firm base that will prevent its movement – to help prevent unplanned movement of the machine during use
In addition to the written documentation, our safety professionals review these reports in person or via phone to ensure that all proposed guards and controls provide maximum user protection, are easily adjustable and neither interfere with production nor increase the hazard of the machine. This valuable documentation can also be used to supplement existing Tech Ed Curriculum is support of school to work initiatives and to support MNOSHA Safety Grant Applications.

Keywords: District Safety, Industrial Technology, Machine Safety, risk assessment,