Draggar’s Universe » Business

By: Draggar  09-12-2011

Draggar’s Universe » Business

That’s why I’m dedicating this post on how to be a good technician.  This is going to be a surprise to a lot of techs out there but it is not based on what you know.  Seriously.  While I do admit, being able to solve the user’s issue in a minute does help, it’s not the end all to customer satisfaction.

First - and most important:  LISTEN.  That is a human you’re interacting with.

I don’t mean sit and listen to a 30 minute rant at how they are terrible with computers, they always have problems with computers, and Microsoft is in existence just to make their lives difficult.  When they are describing the issue to you, listen to them, make eye contact.  Don’t just plop down in front of their computer and start taping away at the keyboard – that will make you look like a robot (and that’s only OK if you’re JP from “Grandma’s Boy” – but even he was annoying).  Plus, this makes the user feel like a number as opposed to a person.

Listen to their concerns, don’t be afraid to ask questions (believe it or not it does not make you look incompetent, in fact, it makes it look like you are paying attention!), even repeat what the user said to make sure you understand what they are saying.

Second – don’t rush the job.  Yes, some issues only take a minute or two to fix but many don’t.  Don’t try to fly through it.  Take your time.  If you rush, the chances of you making a mistake are greatly increased.  Even double check your work if you need to.  This leads right into:

Third – Make sure you have resolved the issue, if possible.  Sit down with the user, explain to them what you did (in non-technical terms), and have them verify that the issue has been resolved.  If they couldn’t print, have them send something to the printer.  If they couldn’t access a site, have them access it.  One of the worst feelings I get is when I get a repeat user with the same issue and it’s because I didn’t solve it the first time.

Keep in touch with that network.  As long as you do this, your network will grow.  Yes, people will leave but others will come into the groups.  Your group will grow and the knowledge base of the group will grow with it.  Even if you’re alone there are many techie sites out there that you can join for quick answers (for example, Windrivers – http://forums.windrivers.com).

Also, it’s not about what you know but can you find the answer?  I worked with a guy once who had his CCNA, MCSP, MCP+I, A+, N+, and graduated “with honors” from a local well known computer school.  Let’s just ay he spent over 10 minutes arguing with a customer (over the phone) claiming that they knew nothing about computers since they didn’t know what operating system they were running and he couldn’t help them.  He never heard of Windows 3.1 (and this was back in 2000).  Now, who do you think the customers would rather deal with – him, who didn’t even know how to install drivers but had that education, or me with no education but someone who would be willing to jump onto Google.com or ask a few co-workers for the answers?

Don’t be an arrogant jackass.  This is one of the biggest complaints.  Seriously, you’re talking to a human.  Just because you know (allegedly) know more about computers than they do doesn’t mean you can treat them like bubblegum under your shoe.  I’m sure there are areas they could whoop your rear in, sales, engineering,and  SOCIAL SKILLS.

Be presentable.  Don’t go to work dirty in raggedy clothes.  Well, this might be OK in a surf shop or a grunge store but not many techs work there.  Adhere to the dress code (my office is business causal, I either wear nice jeans or khakis and a polo shirt), shower, etc.

Respect their time.  Yes, I’ve said people need to respect the techs time but techs need to respect the customer’s time, too.  They are your customer, even if they aren’t directly paying you.  Just because you just logged onto World of Warcraft doesn’t mean you can tell everyone to wait.  They have things to do or else they wouldn’t need the computers.

Don’t be the militant police.  Every day I see software on computers that shouldn’t be on there (including mine) but I understand that corporate either gives us horrible options for what we need or no option at all.  Unless it is a security risk (torrent software, etc.), a resource hog and shouldn’t be there (once I found someone had installed Pirates of the Caribbean online on their computer) , or has absolutely no business on a work PC (porn), I don’t care.  So what they have TradeWinds Legends on their computer.  So what if they have iTunes.  I don’t care as long as they fully understand I will not support them and will not reinstall them if I need to reinstall Windows on their PCs (and I will let them know if that is causing the issue, too).  I did once report that some employees were using a hacker site to go around the internet firewall while working in the stores.  My issue with that:  they’re allowing you to see the whole internet, what do you think you’re allowing them to see on your computer that has complete access to all of our customers’ information?  Trust me; I’m willing to bet you have skeletons in your closet, too.

I’m sure there is a lot more I could write on this subject but it’s a Friday evening (and I’m blogging?), it’s been a long week, and David Byrne’s film “True Stories” just came in and I want to watch it. 


Other products and services from Draggar

09-12-2011

Draggar’s Universe » Domains

I would lose all the time and money I put into the site plus the large corporation would then quickly and easily gain from all of my hard work and my reputation as a web master would be tarnished since I would have this case against me and would have a “cyber squatter” black mark on my name.


09-12-2011

Draggar’s Universe » Animals

Thank god that I live in an area where you CAN defend yourself and property and it’s already gone into the courts and they ruled in favor of the people protecting their property. Guy and Elizabeth James, the Princeton Township couple whose German shepherd mauled a landscaper who came onto their property on June 5, 2007,. It is amazing how messed up laws are getting in this country along with the media in regards to dogs.


09-12-2011

Draggar’s Universe » Humor

They’ll spend 20 minutes explaining a while chain of events, this lead to that, just to get to their issue, which is usually something that could have been explained in a few seconds. They can make shortcuts, store favorites, they know the search command, and once in a while they’ll know how to connect to network printers and create new PST files.


09-12-2011

Draggar’s Universe » Consumer

Sure, it’s nice to be compensated for your troubles, but if you’re looking for free service, expect to pay for something in return, maybe a discount on the service or even a contract. Managers usually have more leeway with the rules, as long as they have a good reason to and their decision is a good one for the business. I’ve personally driven over 20 miles out of my way to help out someone because they were respectful and polite to me.