Reportage | Sublim Creative Studio

By: Sublim  09-12-2011
Keywords: retouching

Linda : How did you determine your business direction at the beginning? Why not choose commercial spots and video effects, instead of pictures and CGI composition?

Dominique : I chose my business direction first by considering all of my professional experience. I gained most of it in digital imagery, not in film, which made it clear to me that I am more interested, able and appreciative of high-resolution image work. My background is in professional graphic design, and I have a university degree in that field. For many years I worked in multimedia, specifically as a Senior 3D Texture Artist for more than 6 years. I also worked for major American studios in animation and movie related activities. I always used Photoshop software and had success with it. So it was clear to me, when I started to work in the fashion industry, that I would combine all my skills and experience and be able to perfect my retouching techniques. Life brought me to the fashion field. Without really planning ahead, I decided to offer my services as a personal assistant for photo shoots to international clients. My intent was to visit different countries and see what was done artistically throughout the world. This is something I really enjoy doing. One thing led to another and I discovered that I really wanted to specialize in photo retouching, so I started my own business. I never doubted that I had made the right decision, and I am having a ball doing it!

L : How long does it take to process a picture? How many people have input? What kind of tasks do these people have?

D : Each project is different. Depending on the client’s expectations, their deadline and budget, we adjust and make sure they get as much as possible for what they put in. So, as you can see, it is not as much a matter of time as it is a team effort from us, as well as with our clients. For example, when there are 3D elements to take into consideration there are a lot more people involved and the project is often on a big scale. In the specific pictures like “Robotic” that you’re referring to, there were four 3D artists involved. One who did the modeling, another the textures, and the other the lighting and the rendering. There was also a 3D artist from France who made the earpiece. We often have clients who are graphic designers themselves. Some are in the music industry or with advertising agencies, etc. They might need just a little something to make their work stand out from the rest. More and more European advertising agencies use 3D effects, and haute couture agencies are following this trend. This is in good part why I decided that Sublim would offer outstanding service to all of our current and potential international clients.

L : Could you introduce your production pipeline briefly?

D : My pipeline begins with numerous contacts with other artists who might need specialized services like the ones I offer. It also involves my own business development, which I do by attending many national and international activities and trade shows. Then I meet with clients. During the briefing we gather all the possible information like details on the project, the content and its use, the client’s expectations from us. We work to define the scope of the project. We agree on deadlines and budgets. The client must give us the quantity of pictures they want us to retouch. Together, we determine if the addition of 2D or 3D elements could be an advantage. Mock-ups are made through the entire process to validate ideas, concepts, techniques, effects, etc. It’s definitely a great asset to be able to use artists’ creative inputs to improve the global concept. What’s most important, the objective, is to create a picture that has an impact. A great creative director makes sure that all the artists are going in the same direction and that the stages of production follow the proper order.

L : Where do you get your inspiration?

D : We, artists, get our inspiration virtually everywhere: life, nature, family and friends, magazines, Internet. For the “Robotic” project, for example, we were inspired by Giger and Sky Doll (the blond model). The clothes and accessories chosen by the stylist also helped us to set the tone of the pictures. The sunglasses are by Versace, clothes by Denis Gagnon, who is a renowned Canadian designer. As you can see, we are avid lovers of creations. We thrive on other people’s work, as well as our own ideas. But the clients order always remains the base of our inspiration, our research, our concepts, and our art creations.

Linda: How did you determine your business direction at the beginning? Why not choose commercial spots and video effects, instead of pictures and CGI composition?

Dominique: I chose my business direction first by considering all of my professional experience. I gained most of it in digital imagery, not in film, which made it clear to me that I am more interested, able and appreciative of high-resolution image work. My background is in professional graphic design, and I have a university degree in that field. For many years I worked in multimedia, specifically as a Senior 3D Texture Artist for more than 6 years. I also worked for major American studios in animation and movie related activities. I always used Photoshop software and had success with it. So it was clear to me, when I started to work in the fashion industry, that I would combine all my skills and experience and be able to perfect my retouching techniques. Life brought me to the fashion field. Without really planning ahead, I decided to offer my services as a personal assistant for photo shoots to international clients. My intent was to visit different countries and see what was done artistically throughout the world. This is something I really enjoy doing. One thing led to another and I discovered that I really wanted to specialize in photo retouching, so I started my own business almost a year ago to do that. I never doubted that I had made the right decision, and I am having a ball doing it!

L: How long does it take to process a picture? How many people have input? What kind of tasks do these people have?

D: Each project is different. Depending on the client’s expectations, their deadline and budget, we adjust and make sure they get as much as possible for what they put in. So, as you can see, it is not as much a matter of time as it is a team effort from us, as well as with our clients. For example, when there are 3D elements to take into consideration there are a lot more people involved and the project is often on a big scale. In the specific pictures like “Robotic” that you’re referring to, there were four 3D artists involved. One who did the modeling, another the textures, and the other the lighting and the rendering. There was also a 3D artist from France who made the earpiece. We often have clients who are graphic designers themselves. Some are in the music industry or with advertising agencies, etc. They might need just a little something to make their work stand out from the rest. More and more European advertising agencies use 3D effects, and haute couture agencies are following this trend. This is in good part why I decided that Sublim would offer outstanding service to all of our current and potential international clients.

L: Could you introduce your production pipeline briefly?

D: My pipeline begins with numerous contacts with other artists who might need specialized services like the ones I offer. It also involves my own business development, which I do by attending many national and international activities and trade shows. Then I meet with clients. During the briefing we gather all the possible information like details on the project, the content and its use, the client’s expectations from us. We work to define the scope of the project. We agree on deadlines and budgets. The client must give us the quantity of pictures they want us to retouch. Together, we determine if the addition of 2D or 3D elements could be an advantage. Mock-ups are made through the entire process to validate ideas, concepts, techniques, effects, etc. It’s definitely a great asset to be able to use artists’ creative inputs to improve the global concept. What’s most important, the objective, is to create a picture that has an impact. A great creative director makes sure that all the artists are going in the same direction and that the stages of production follow the proper order.

L: Where do you get your inspiration?

D: We, artists, get our inspiration virtually everywhere: life, nature, family and friends, magazines, Internet. For the “Robotic” project, for example, we were inspired by Giger and Sky Doll (the blond model). The clothes and accessories chosen by the stylist also helped us to set the tone of the pictures. The sunglasses are by Versace, clothes by Denis Gagnon, who is a renowned Canadian designer. As you can see, we are avid lovers of creations. We thrive on other people’s work, as well as our own ideas. But the clients order always remains the base of our inspiration, our research, our concepts, and our art creations.
L : Could you introduce your production pipeline briefly?

D : My pipeline begins with numerous contacts with other artists who might need specialized services like the ones I offer. It also involves my own business development, which I do by attending many national and international activities and trade shows. Then I meet with clients. During the briefing we gather all the possible information like details on the project, the content and its use, the client’s expectations from us. We work to define the scope of the project. We agree on deadlines and budgets. The client must give us the quantity of pictures they want us to retouch. Together, we determine if the addition of 2D or 3D elements could be an advantage. Mock-ups are made through the entire process to validate ideas, concepts, techniques, effects, etc. It’s definitely a great asset to be able to use artists’ creative inputs to improve the global concept. What’s most important, the objective, is to create a picture that has an impact. A great creative director makes sure that all the artists are going in the same direction and that the stages of production follow the proper order.

L : Where do you get your inspiration?

D : We, artists, get our inspiration virtually everywhere: life, nature, family and friends, magazines, Internet. For the “Robotic” project, for example, we were inspired by Giger and Sky Doll (the blond model). The clothes and accessories chosen by the stylist also helped us to set the tone of the pictures. The sunglasses are by Versace, clothes by Denis Gagnon, who is a renowned Canadian designer. As you can see, we are avid lovers of creations. We thrive on other people’s work, as well as our own ideas. But the clients order always remains the base of our inspiration, our research, our concepts, and our art creations.

Keywords: retouching

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