Mind Over Matter Communication » Mind Over Matter

By: Beth Agnew  09-12-2011
Keywords: Technology Transfer, Science News, Technical Communicators

I’ve written lately about a new fusion reactor and how the scientific process should be applied to test it. Let me take those ideas a step further by saying that innovation is necessary in this complex world, but technology transfer is even more necessary.

Technology transfer is the passing of knowledge from one person or group to another. We can have the most innovative and useful technologies in the shop or the lab, but unless the word is spread about them they remain unknown. We often cannot count on the inventors to tell us about their creations. Their skills like in making the technology or the discovery, not in marketing or publicity. Besides, a publicity effort would take their valuable time away from further development of their ideas.

Filed under:, , , , , , ,

Andrea Rossi has convincingly demonstrated his E-Cat reactor that produces more energy from a reaction than from a purely chemical process. Nickel plus hydrogen, 80 watts in, 15,000 watts out and no radioactive residue to get rid of afterward, only a little copper.

Strangely, the scientific press are remaining silent on this discovery. Perhaps having been burned by previous “cold fusion” claims that remained unproven, they are twice shy. However, when scientific heavyweights no less than Nobel prize winner for Physics Brian Josephson of Cambridge University talk about an invention, we need to pay attention. Rossi is clearly on to something. Given the size of the reaction chamber, it can’t be other than…fusion.

I am surprised that the scientific media are declining to cover this story. It is their responsibility to publicize science news so that the broader scientific community can become aware, then question, probe, investigate and even validate any claims. If something attracts the attention and support of respected scientists such as Josephson it deserves its moment in the spotlight.

According to NASA Chief Scientist Dennis M. Bushnell, reactors of the Rossi type are already in production and may be capable of “completely changing geo-economics, geo-politics, and solving climate and energy.”

I often tell my students that as technical communicators, we are professional gadflies. It is our job to buzz persistently, and bite when necessary, to get certain things done. We cannot move forward with documentation on a product that is languishing, so we interact with the developers to see how things are going. We ask for prototypes and working versions. We query them about deadlines, especially “When’s code freeze?”.

As a working technical communicator, I often found myself as one of the few people (and sometimes the only one!) in the company who knew exactly what products we were working on and where they fit into the company’s vision. To do my job of documenting the products and consulting on their usability (how a product helps users achieve their objectives with it), I spoke to every department in the company at one point or another.

I was mostly involved with the research and development departments, but I frequently spoke to or worked with marketing to understand the customer they were trying to reach, and to sales to find out what aspects of the product(s) buyers were most interested in. This information gave me a sense of who the end user would be and what their needs were for the product or service they were purchasing. In that way, I could orient my documentation more effectively toward the user’s tasks.

Like dropping a stone into a calm pond, building your social network starts ripples that will pay off in ways you cannot even imagine. When I talk about networking for business, I mention the analogy of planting seeds. The harvest doesn’t come instantly, but when it does, it usually turns out to be well worth the wait.

A ripple spreading out across a pond takes time to travel, too. It may collide with other ripples, started by other stones — yours or someone else’s. Our social media activities are small gestures, just 140 characters, or a short status on Facebook, maybe even a brief comment on a blog. This is far less work than traditional business networking activities. You can achieve more with less effort.

Traditional businesses in the offline world, or “bricks and mortar” companies, had the same needs as anyone doing business online today: getting the word out about their products and services. Way back when, pre-1992 and the Web, we used personal networking as a powerful channel to tell other people about our businesses and get referrals.

We joined the Rotary Club, hoping for the chance to be a guest speaker and have the opportunity to talk about our business. We joined the local Chamber of Commerce and charitable organizations; we served on committees, meeting people who could, it was hoped, refer clients to us, especially after they got to know us and knew of our integrity and business smarts.

Keywords: Chief Scientist, Fusion Reactor, Science News, Technical Communicators, Technology Transfer,

Contact Beth Agnew

Email - none provided

Print this page

Other products and services from Beth Agnew

09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Improvement » Mind Over Matter

Andrea Rossi has convincingly demonstrated his E-Cat reactor that produces more energy from a reaction than from a purely chemical process. We cannot move forward with documentation on a product that is languishing, so we interact with the developers to see how things are going. If something attracts the attention and support of respected scientists such as Josephson it deserves its moment in the spotlight.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Science » Mind Over Matter

Let me take those ideas a step further by saying that innovation is necessary in this complex world, but technology transfer is even more necessary. Rossi can certainly provide a “black box” version of his reactor to reputable scientists to test and evaluate. I’ve written lately about a new fusion reactor and how the scientific process should be applied to test it.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Technology Transfer » Mind Over Matter

However, when scientific heavyweights no less than Nobel prize winner for Physics Brian Josephson of Cambridge University talk about an invention, we need to pay attention. Nobody wants to waste time, energy, or money on something that does not live up to its claims, nor rush to market something that has not been thoroughly investigated.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Design » Mind Over Matter

We cannot move forward with documentation on a product that is languishing, so we interact with the developers to see how things are going. It is our job to buzz persistently, and bite when necessary, to get certain things done. I often tell my students that as technical communicators, we are professional gadflies. We ask for prototypes and working versions. We query them about deadlines.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter People » Mind Over Matter

Andrea Rossi has convincingly demonstrated his E-Cat reactor that produces more energy from a reaction than from a purely chemical process. If something attracts the attention and support of respected scientists such as Josephson it deserves its moment in the spotlight. Features became selling points, even though marketers kept reminding us that it was benefits, not features, that sold products.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Products » Mind Over Matter

Let me take those ideas a step further by saying that innovation is necessary in this complex world, but technology transfer is even more necessary. Andrea Rossi has convincingly demonstrated his E-Cat reactor that produces more energy from a reaction than from a purely chemical process. If something attracts the attention and support of respected scientists such as Josephson it deserves its moment in the spotlight.


09-12-2011

Mind Over Matter Business » Mind Over Matter

We cannot move forward with documentation on a product that is languishing, so we interact with the developers to see how things are going. Like dropping a stone into a calm pond, building your social network starts ripples that will pay off in ways you cannot even imagine. Features became selling points, even though marketers kept reminding us that it was benefits, not features, that sold products.