Welcome to ABLE Orthotics » Articles for Healthcare Professionals

By: Able Orthotics  09-12-2011

For each of our patients we provide an assessment report for the referring physician(s). This is simply a quick reference to clarify terms we use frequently while some or all of the terminology may be familiar to you we wanted to be through.  As always if you have any questions please give us a call.

Clinical Observation Terminology

Excessive Pronation – triplanar motion of abduction, eversion and dorsiflexion

Excessive Supination – triplanar motion of adduction, inversion and plantarflexion

adduction – movement or deformity in the transverse plane toward the median

abduction – movement or deformity in the transverse plane away from median

eversion – movement in the frontal plane towards the midline

inversion – movement in the frontal plane away from the midline

Forefoot Valgus

valgus – position of eversion, deformity in the frontal plane

Forefoot Varus

Varus – position of inversion, deformity in the frontal plane

Plantarflexed First Ra

plantarflexed / plantarflexion – downward position / movement in the sagittal plane

dorsiflexed / dorsiflexion – upward position / movement in the sagittal plane

internal rotation – movement around the vertical axis so anterior aspect faces towards median

external rotation – movement around vertical axis so anterior aspect faces away from median

circumduction – movement in circular pattern combining flexion, extension, abduction and adduction

Orthotic Terminology:

Metatarsal Pad: placed proximal to the metatarsal heads to support the transverse arch and unload the central metatarsal heads

Metatarsal Bar – placed proximal to the metatarsal heads to

support the transverse arch and unload 1-5 or 2-5 metatarsal heads

Casting

Casting is the process of capturing the 3D shape of the foot in the corrected position. At ABLE, we choose the method that will allow the best results for each patient’s individual needs.  Our casting methods include:

  • direct mold – the material that will become the shell of the orthotic is heated and wrapped around the foot directly; semi-weight-bearing or full weight-bearing
  • foam box – patients foot is pressed into a box of compressible foam by the pedorthist; semi-weight-bearing
  • plaster bandage – strips of plaster of Paris are wrapped around the foot; non-weight-bearing
  • laser scanner – electronic imaging matched with AutoCAD software and milling machine

Materials

At ABLE, we have more than 40 different material combinations to choose from when we design each orthotic device and we select the appropriate materials based on the patient’s needs. Options include:

  • Accommodative
  • corrective
  • cushion
  • semi-rigid
  • rigid


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