Facebook « Brian Bowman – On the Cutting Edge

By: Brian Bowman  09-12-2011
Keywords: Privacy Commissioner

Facebook « Brian Bowman – On the Cutting Edge

November 4, 2011

| , , , , | Tagged: , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


September 27, 2011

Some things you may not know… Under the default settings, when a person tags you in a status update this will appear on your profile. Therefore you may want to consider using the new tag/post review features in order to allow you to choose whether it makes it onto your wall or not. The default settings are set to “off”. When someone tags you in a post, it will be that person’s privacy settings that have final say over what is visible unless you specifically adjust the settings pertaining to posts you are tagged in. So make sure you personalize your privacy settings individually, because a “one size fits all” approach may not be in your best interests.

Do these changes require you to revisit your privacy settings? Your privacy settings should not have changed from what they were before, however some simplifications have been made. Therefore it is important that you check your settings to see what settings are now controlled “inline” (again, meaning adjustable for each separate post whether it be a picture, post or other information) and make sure that these inline controls are by default set to what you want.

What should you be doing moving forward? It is important to remember that Facebook is continually updating its layout, and this includes its privacy templates. While users should not fear that their settings will completely reset each time such changes occur, they should keep a close eye on new features that may (1) replace an existing feature; (2) remove an existing feature entirely; or (3) introduce something entirely different, which might require some tweaking from its default settings.

| , , , | Tagged: , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


July 7, 2011
  • highlights of the new law
  • why you should care 
  • an overview of the rules  
  • penalties for non-compliance; and
  • proactive tips to help comply with the law

| , , , , , , , , | Tagged: , , , , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


May 6, 2011

| , , , , , , , | Tagged: , , , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


April 14, 2011

Here’s a in the Globe & Mail’s Report on Business about the thorny issue of workplace monitoring. As I’m quoted by the Globe & Mail, “I recognize employers have risks and obligations to manage data, but on the other hand going to a more Big Brother approach isn’t the answer. And the privacy commissioner and the courts would agree with that.” Read the full article

| , , , | Tagged: , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


March 15, 2011

| , , | Tagged: , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


February 24, 2011

Doing the presentation made me think that it might help your organization to highlight the following previous posts… Hope they help!

| , , , , | Tagged: , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


November 15, 2010

| , , , , , | Tagged: , , , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


October 26, 2010

If your answer is “no” you’re wrong. Sorry, but it was a trick question. Whether your organization admits it or not, it is in the social media world.  Clients, prospective clients, employees and even competitors are almost certainly engaging in conversations about your organization on Facebook and LinkedIn. The question is whether you’re a part (or even aware) of those conversations. The second question is what are you going to do to shape those conversations, to the extent that you can?

The reality is that Canadian employees, for example, are blogging, tweeting and accessing social networking websites with increasing frequency. And the result is increased legal risks for Canadian businesses. These risks include disgruntled employees intentionally revealing trade secrets, defaming supervisors, harassing co-workers, or posting negative information about their employers’ business. There are even additional threats resulting from loyal employees who inadvertently disclose information online that runs afoul of privacy and competition laws. These threats won’t go away if your company has its head in the sand regarding social media.

One important step to dealing with and leveraging social media is to implement a social media policy within your organization. Doing so won’t address every potential headache related to social media, but it will help to manage online discussions that are occurring during and after work hours by your own employees. And since some of the greatest risks I’ve mentioned above stem from your employees, my best advice is to implement a social media policy. Key components in a social media policy should include:

  • defining the scope of prohibited activities;
  • clarifying to whom the policy applies;
  • addressing how infringing content should be removed from social media sites;
  • spelling out who, when and how monitoring of social media sites occurs; and
  • advising of penalties and enforcement of the policy.

| , , , , , | Tagged: , , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


October 18, 2010

| , , , | Tagged: , , , |
Posted by Brian Bowman


Keywords: Privacy Commissioner

Other products and services from Brian Bowman

09-12-2011

Marketing « Brian Bowman – On the Cutting Edge

Nike has refuted the allegations and stated that “the Dunk shoe design is not substantially similar to any of the Van Halen designs, and Nike has not referenced the Van Halen name or image as part of any marketing campaign or promotional material associated with the shoe..


09-12-2011

PIPEDA « Brian Bowman – On the Cutting Edge

Certainly one of the most rewarding things for me is to know that our work matters, that it has a real and positive impact on the lives of Canadians. We’re seeing unimaginable quantities of data flash around the world, including to countries where data-protection laws are slim to non-existent. So I would encourage business leaders to start giving some thought now to how they can bring their processes into compliance.