Tom Malaher’s BrainScan » Software

By: Malaher Family  09-12-2011
Keywords: Phone Book, Numeric Keypad, Macintosh Programming,

Tom Malaher’s BrainScan » Software


Cloud Computing

What is Cloud Computing? This talk will survey the landscape (cloudscape?), try to define cloud computing, where and how it can be used, and demo some live code running on one of the more mature offerings in a relatively new industry: Amazon Web Services or AWS.Tom Malaher has been working in the IT industry for 20+ years as a developer (C, Perl, Java, Web, SQL) and system administrator (almost every flavour of Unix known to man, and Windows only in self-defence). His current role is as an architect and back end integration (aka “glue”) developer.

Bow Valley College

332 - 6 Ave S.E.Room N-438

5:30 PM, Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Free admission for the general public.

Cleaning up the office a bit, came across a box full of Mac floppies, left over from my original Mac.

It was a “Fat Mac” Business Bundle, 512K RAM, 2 400K (single sided!) floppy drives, keyboard with numeric keypad (default keyboard had no numeric keypad). At the same time I got Macintosh Pascal and the Macintosh Programming Guidelines book (which was the size of a phone book and printed on similar low-grade thin paper).

Total cost: $3,512.25 in about 1986 (and that was the student discount price!) purchased from the University of Manitoba bookstore.

Here are some of the floppies.

Five of them likely came with the original machine.

The one labelled “Macintosh Plus System Tools” is from later (note that it says “double sided”) after I had upgraded the machine to a Mac Plus (swap out the system board and upgrade the floppies to double sided: 800K!).

Note the handwritten version numbers: Finder 5.1, System 3.0, and DAM 3.0, whatever the heck that was. Some disks were bootable (i.e. they had System and Finder on them) while others were not, so it was important to know which were which (”System and Macwrite Macpaint”) and what version they were (cf. my “NotUpd” notation on the Macwrite/paint disk and my “Upd” notation faintly visible on the Mac Pascal disk).

I wrote my thesis on this machine, using Word 3.0 for the Mac. I have the floppies somewhere, and was able to get the files off them, but I’ve been unable to reconstruct the text of the document, let alone the formatting. Luckily I have a nice hardcover version on the bookshelf.

The screen sharing seemed to behave as expected.

What is Cloud Computing? Every vendor seems to define it differently.

Last month’s CJUG speaker (Nikita Ivanov from GridGain) talked about how to more easily use cloud computing resources for grid computing. Of course he gave his own definition of Cloud computing…

But let’s step back a moment and try to figure out what cloud computing is all about.

This talk will survey the landscape (cloudscape?), try to define cloud computing, where it might be used, and demo some actual Java code running on one of the more mature offerings in a newborn industry: Amazon Web Services or AWS.

To quote from the CJUG page:

This has been one of my concerns all along.

The claim is that “enough testing” will eliminate the need for the compiler to do static checking at compile time.

http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=217080

Frank Sommers seems to be saying otherwise… in the long run.

So, I’m feeling justified in my decision to stick with Java, where I gain maximal benefit from IDEs and compilers.

See you there!

I started putting together a specification for a password “lockbox” that would handle this. It would have to be able to handle standalone machines that were their own security domain (e.g. Unix with local passwd file) or a group of machines that share the same password (e.g. NIS or AD). It would be nice if you could encode the password expiration policy and have the system automatically change the password for you so it wouldn’t expire. You’d want sophisticated ACLs to control who can see which passwords.

It’s not cheap, but on the old build-versus-buy continuum, I think this is one I’d rather buy.

For those times when you just don’t want to write a CRUD interface or use raw SQL. DbVisualizer’s “Update where” and “Insert into” functionality is OK for one or two rows, but this tool lets you edit many rows almost painlessly.

One of the features I’ve used is the charting of foreign-key relationships to build a cube-wall sized poster of the data model for a product we installed. I pasted together 9 letter-sized sheets (the product knows how to print the huge image in segments). Life saver.

I use the free version, and I’ve even tried out the “personal” (i.e. for-pay) version on a trial license for a while and the graphing capability was pretty fun too, but I have other ways to do that and so didn’t go for it.

The information in this article was current at 06 Dec 2011

Keywords: Macintosh Programming, Numeric Keypad, Phone Book, System Board,

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