KnowMap - Categories

By: Knowmap  09-12-2011
Keywords: Auditing, Knowledge Management, Toolkit

If you feel you may have something to offer to our readers, check the categories below to see where your idea best fits.

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TOOLKIT: - -
CASE STUDIES: - - -
FEATURES: - - -
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Editorials are commentary from the Editor-in-Chief or a guest editor to set the tone and theme of a particular issue. Usually the Editor-in-Chief extends an invitation to a guest editor. However, suggestions for theme or guest editor are always welcome.

Special views are invited comments and contributions to the topic or theme of a particular issue. These are akin to Letters to the Editor, however, are covered in the issue to which they are applicable rather than in the more general letters section.

This section deals with answers to such questions as:

  • What skills, what titles, what changes are necessary for the workforce to become better knowledge workers or to improve their learning and utilization of knowledge?
  • What are the roles of various workers in fostering, implementing and designing good knowledge management practices?

Focus group interviews revealed these most frequently asked questions

  • What should we call ourselves?
  • What are our new roles and responsibilities?
  • What changes can we expect in the near future in our work life or careers?
  • What skills will we need to improve and grow to continue to be gainfully and happily employed in our lifetimes?

This section deals with such issues as:

  • The impact corporate culture has on workers and organizations
  • How negative aspects can be remedied
  • What cultural climates help foster knowledge enhancing practices

Without a proper culture in place it is next to impossible for the professional to reach his or her full potential or contribute to better knowledge management practices. Our readers want to know what impact the changing corporate culture has on them and what they can do about negative aspects of culture to make it a more positive experience.

When our focus groups were asked what were their biggest unknowns regarding culture and knowledge management initiatives the resounding response was "how can we introduce innovative practices when this is met with resistance from top, bottom or others around us?"

A second question on their minds was "what can we do about corporate double-speak - that is when we are told to do one thing (share knowledge) and then feel punished for doing so?"

How to punish and reward to foster knowledge sharing has been the topic of many early articles on knowledge management initiatives. Yet we have learned many of these backfired. Lessons learned - even if it is what not to do - would be of great value to our readers.

Articles in this section include methods to use in developing knowledge management strategies.

There are several important resources in the Knowledge Practitioner's toolkit. We include various regular sections to cover these practical tools and how to use them to implement knowledge management initiatives.

These sections are devoted to methodology and theory, including the how, when, why, and where to employ these tools and what techniques to use. Actual examples of maps produced, audits conducted and survey results are found in the section called Case Studies.

Each issue may include a number of Toolkit articles under any of the following headings: Standards & Conventions, Mapping and Auditing.

Michael J.D. Sutton, Standards and Certification Advisory Director, started this section on a little known but important topic.

There are very few practitioners who are aware that many methods have been devised to save them time and trouble. This section called Standards & Conventions will demonstrate these important tools for improving the design and implementation of knowledge management initiatives.

This section covers practical ways to implement knowledge management initiatives through Mapping. It may include the how, when, why, and where to employ this tool and what techniques to use.

The Mapping section of Toolkit is devoted to methodology and theory. Actual examples of maps produced and how they were used are found under Case Studies.

Although the focus is on knowledge mapping, articles on information or other related maps that connect to a knowledge management program may also be covered.

This section covers practical ways to implement knowledge management initiatives through Auditing. It may include the how, when, why, and where to employ this tool and what techniques to use.

The Auditing section of Toolkit is devoted to methodology and theory. Actual examples of audits conducted and survey results are found under Case Studies.

Although the focus is on knowledge auditing, articles on information or other audits that connect to a knowledge management program may also be covered.

This section is devoted to case studies demonstrating individual experiments in mapping, auditing or other knowledge management initiatives. The articles describe the results, disclose lessons learned and portray actual examples of maps or audits. Articles may also cover survey results regarding any knowledge management issues.

Focus group participants expressed a strong desire for case studies with actual examples of audits, maps and surveys for lessons learned through real-life trial and error.

Articles on methodology and theory based on the wisdom of writers who gained experience through observing and/or conducting at least several mapping or auditing exercises are found under Toolkit.

Each issue may include a number of Case Studies under any of the following headings: General, Learning, Maps, Audits and Surveys.

General case studies involve more detail than the other categories below or might show several different stages or techniques.

These may also include cases using either a combination of tools or those not specifically classified under knowledge management.

Learning

Learning covers actual educational initiatives, such as Global Learn Day and Socrates Academy. These are either success stories and/or actual initiatives in the planning or early implementation stages.

The cases can involve either traditional classroom or distance learning ventures. They can cover any type of institution or individual program, including public and private academia, universities, government-sponsored literacy programs and in-house business training.

Audits should show the actual questionnaire or process used, the results and the key lessons learned.

If possible audits should show the actual questionnaire or process used, the results and the key lessons learned.

The maps in this section are usually those actually designed or developed by a group or individual. The map itself and the background to its use and creation should be explained. Any information on how it has added value or how it could be improved would be of interest to our readers. If you can supply the map and the background but are not confident about writing the brief article, we are still eager to show your example. Please submit a tif (preferred), gif or jpeg file of your map and a note explaining how it was conceived and why. An editorial staff member will prepare the article.

What we want to see here are the results not the how to (which would go under Auditing). Who was surveyed and why? What did the survey reveal about knowledge management practices or needs?

Surveys generally include those targeted at an external audience, such as customers, while audits are usually internal investigations.

The Features category includes various offerings of value to subscribers and non-subscribers alike. Currently it covers Jobs, Events, Reviews and Links.

Any interested parties, including non-subscribers, can access the Jobs area for free. Jobs are usually updated more frequently than the publication itself to ensure the postings are current.

Jobs should appeal to those looking for positions as practitioner, professional, manager or higher in knowledge management environs.

Job submissions should include the following information:

  • Title of Position
  • Name of Organization
  • Location of Position
  • Any other important general information
  • Deadline date (this is very important!)

Followed by the following sections:

  • Description
  • Responsibilities
  • Qualifications

Be sure to include contact instructions for those submitting the resume, such as:

  • Contact name:
  • Contact Position:
  • Organization:
  • E-Mail address and/or website where online submission of application and resume can be found
  • And/Or Mail address And/Or Fax Number for submitting applications
  • Contact e-mail, phone number, fax (optional)

Let us know if you would like to have your position as the FeaturedJob on the cover page of our latest issue. We will quote you the current rate for this upon request.

The public, including non-subscribers, will be able to access the Events area. Events are usually updated more frequently than the publication itself to ensure the postings are current.

Events should relate to knowledge management topics or have at least one session geared to those interested in this field.

Event submissions should include the following information:

  • Title of Event: Subtitle if applicable
  • Date (month, day, year in full) of event; City, Country location of Event (specific Hotel or Conference Centre)
  • Very brief significant notes may be included.
  • Contact information should include organizing body, address, phone, fax, e-mail, contact person (if applicable) and url where more information can be found.

Let us know if you would like to have your event as the FeaturedEvent on the cover page of our latest issue. We will quote you the current rate for this upon request.

We form reciprocal links to pages mentioning and linking to KnowMap. If you have or know of a link to KnowMap that is not found on the Links page, please send a message including the appropriate url to . The page linking to us must have content related to knowledge management, business or other appropriate topics.

Reporters are also required to cover KM events. For those events where free access is allowed for members of the press, this will be the primary benefit in return for your reports on those events.

These reports will generally be carried in the CaseStudies - General section unless the event was in a particular subject area covered under another Category.

For further information on Submissions see and . Also check out for information on our initial survey results. This may spark a suggestion for a new topic suitable to the needs of our audience. Then submit proposals or ideas to

Keywords: Auditing, Knowledge Management, Toolkit

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Simply put, knowledge management is the fostering and leveraging of learning to increase profit or wealth of stakeholders, whether the profits are monetary or other and whether the stakeholders include those with interests in a for profit or non-profit organization.